Cheddar Biscuits

Biscuits. Cheddar biscuits.

Cheddar Biscuit Glory

I’ve been on a warpath lately – luckily for you (and my roommates) this warpath is filled with fierce love, cold butter, and lots of shredding on a quest for my perfect cheddar biscuit. Through all my baking adventures, my mom always says, “If you only master good bread and biscuits, you’re set. Everyone will love you.” When it comes to these biscuits, I think I’m well on my way. Man, I hope my future husband isn’t gluten intolerant. That would be a deal breaker huge hurdle. “No bourbon” would also be a problem, but I suppose I can always make an Old Fashioned for one.

Biscuits used to scare me. I don’t know why, but I think it had something to do with all the fuss over the size of the butter and the speed at which you incorporate it into the dry ingredients so your hot little hands don’t melt the dang butter. I’m here to tell you, don’t be a scaredy cat like me – jump in the biscuit dough, the butter’s fine! …or something like that.

Biscuit Dough

Fast to come together and no rest or rise time, biscuits are a dream bread. They successfully masquerade as breakfast, lunch, dinner, or a snack. Sweet or savory? It’s a choose your own adventure sort of bread once you’ve mastered the basics. My great aunt made a mean biscuit, but this recipe works as a great base biscuit (just leave out the cheddar…although that seems foolish).

If you have the same fear of

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Omelettes Two Ways

Dordogne Postcard

I love getting postcards. There’s something so exciting about that photo from afar with foreign postage and a note scrawled on the back briefly telling of exciting adventures sending love your way. They make me so happy, I use them as bookmarks. When living in France and traveling the world, I started my own tradition of getting a postcard every place I went. I’m not big on souvenirs, so this is the perfect thing – they capture a part of the trip that I loved, I can write down some of the best parts of the trip, and they’re cheap :)

Postcards

Last week I got a postcard from the lovely Annie, whom has been living in Don’t stop! Keep reading…

Orange & Toasted Almond Scones

You know what’s kind of rad?

Orange and almond scones

…bringing back “rad” and making these delicious beauties with ingredients purchased last minute at the drug store. Scones are made with basic pantry ingredients, and are easily jazzed up with almost anything you want to toss in there: dried cherries and dark chocolate? Yes. Blueberries and ginger? Absolutely. Bacon and oregano? …yes, but let’s just call that a biscuit.

 

And orange and toasted almond? Definitely. The proof is in the puddin. Well, scone. Side note: as I blog, I’m consistently realizing how many food idioms I use – that’s a good thing, right? This is much like the time I realized how many baseball idioms I use when I was living with a Brit :)  (Thanks Dad!) But I digress.

Orange and almond scones

I’m not always a great planner, and when I’m not super prepared, it’s a recipe like this that really saves the day. And ya know, it’s often the unexpected, last minute things that turn out to be the best :)

 

Here’s what I did:

Orange and almond scones

Orange and Toasted Almond Scones

*Feel free to substitute other ingredients for the orange zest, almonds, and almond extract! Let’s get creative.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Using the grater blade on your food processor or a cheese grater, grate:

-1 stick salted butter, frozen

Then using the basic flat blade on your food processor, pulse until breadcrumb texture is achieved:

-2 1/3 c. all-purpose flour

-1 c. whole wheat flour

-3 tsp. baking powder

Pour into a large bowl. Stir in:

-4 Tbs. granulated sugar

-the zest of one orange

-a handful of almonds, chopped and toasted in a dry pan until light brown, cooled

Stir in with a wooden spoon until just mixed:

-1 c. low-fat buttermilk

-1 ¼ tsp. almond extract

Mix to a soft dough. It should be fairly wet and sticky, so you may need to add a little more milk. Turn onto a floured surface and gently roll out or pat down the dough. It’s important not to handle the dough too much so that it stays light and doesn’t get tough. I like to keep it fairly thick, about an inch and a half thick, but you do you. Cut the scones with a biscuit cutter or slice into wedges. Sprinkle with sugar.

Bake on a buttered cookie sheet for 12-15 minutes. This varies depending on oven and thickness of scones, so start checking after 11 or 12 minutes. The tops stay quite pale looking. If you check the bottoms they should be lightly browned, so tip one up to check. Enjoy with whipped cream and jam for breakfast or an afternoon treat!

 

French phrase for fun:

Je vais à l’Ecosse et l’Irlande avec trois des meilleurs amis d’une fille pourrait demander de plus! Eeeeeeeeee!

I’m off to Scotland and Ireland with three of the best friends a girl could ask for! Eeeeeeeeee!